Clothing brand Diesel and real estate group Bel-Invest have unveiled the first residential Diesel Wynwood building, situated in Miami, Florida.

Diesel’s most expensive t-shirts come with a condo in Miami

 

 

In light of the launch, Diesel launched a ‘buy one, get a home free’ campaign, in which consumers can buy “the most expensive t-shirts ever” and get a condo as an added benefit.

The campaign was designed to keep the clothes front-and-centre in the project.

As such, it revolves around 143 tops that cost the approximate of a new dwelling, each t-shirt featuring a front-facing printed graphic of one of 143 apartments at the condo development.

T-shirt “D6-L7” clocks in at a tab of $1,049,000, while t-shirt “F2-L7” has a price tag of $5,500,000. But of course, if you buy one, you get a new home thrown in.

 

Nature and urbanity

This is the fashion brand’s first foray into the world of residential real estate.

Designed by Zyschovich Architects, the Diesel Wynwood – a WELL-certified building – includes a pool, gym, meditation room, meeting space and an open-space lobby with an art gallery zone, plus a courtyard. There are 13 individually-designed penthouse duplexes and maisonettes with private terraces. Cosmic swirls of liquid marble cloak the lobby, halls and apartment bathrooms.

Bringing light into living spaces, the apartments feature gradient walls and discreetly-reflective surfaces that capitalise on the sun. Living spaces are rendered in varying shades according to their directional orientation.

The symbiosis of nature and urbanity at Diesel Wynwood sees the building’s tropical greenery complemented by bold industrial materials of concrete, golden mesh, pipes and metal. Graffiti-etched cement walls recall the scene of renegade murals that define the artistic neighbourhood.

Clad in black brick with minimalist wood screens and broad glass windows and a daring gradient finish on the structure, Diesel Wynwood reflects the Diesel’s most expensive t-shirts come with a condo in Miami

Clothing brand Diesel and real estate group Bel-Invest have unveiled the first residential Diesel Wynwood building, situated in Miami, Florida.

Diesel’s most expensive t-shirts come with a condo in Miami

In light of the launch, Diesel launched a ‘buy one, get a home free’ campaign, in which consumers can buy “the most expensive t-shirts ever” and get a condo as an added benefit.

 

The campaign was designed to keep the clothes front-and-centre in the project.

 

As such, it revolves around 143 tops that cost the approximate of a new dwelling, each t-shirt featuring a front-facing printed graphic of one of 143 apartments at the condo development.

 

T-shirt “D6-L7” clocks in at a tab of $1,049,000, while t-shirt “F2-L7” has a price tag of $5,500,000. But of course, if you buy one, you get a new home thrown in.

 

Nature and urbanity

 

This is the fashion brand’s first foray into the world of residential real estate.

 

Designed by Zyschovich Architects, the Diesel Wynwood – a WELL-certified building – includes a pool, gym, meditation room, meeting space and an open-space lobby with an art gallery zone, plus a courtyard. There are 13 individually-designed penthouse duplexes and maisonettes with private terraces. Cosmic swirls of liquid marble cloak the lobby, halls and apartment bathrooms.

 

Bringing light into living spaces, the apartments feature gradient walls and discreetly-reflective surfaces that capitalise on the sun. Living spaces are rendered in varying shades according to their directional orientation.

 

The symbiosis of nature and urbanity at Diesel Wynwood sees the building’s tropical greenery complemented by bold industrial materials of concrete, golden mesh, pipes and metal. Graffiti-etched cement walls recall the scene of renegade murals that define the artistic neighbourhood.

 

Clad in black brick with minimalist wood screens and broad glass windows and a daring gradient finish on the structure, Diesel Wynwood reflects the warehouses of the neighbourhood in an avant-garde key.warehouses of the neighbourhood in an avant-garde key.

 

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